State of the Art 2017 in Liverpool: “Surprise, Surprise”.

Peter Brindley Circle

Professor Peter Brindley looks back at this year’s meeting and concludes; “The Conference is Dead, Long Live the Conference”.

To the seemingly endless list of unique wonderful things to have come out of Liverpool,2 we can assuredly add 2017’s Intensive Care Society State of the Art conference (SOA). In the sage words of local-girl-done-good Cilla Black: “Surprise surprise…the unexpected hits you between the eyes”. Regardless, I knew I was somewhere special when I asked for a hotel wake-up call and was told: “Certainly Sir, climate change is real”.3 I am delighted to report that the conference was similarly provocative, unexpected, and refreshing.

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State of the Art Day 3 Roundup

Day 3 at the ‘State of the Art’ proved a fitting finale to a meeting packed with lively talks, discussion  and engagement.

The morning started with a call to action with respect to organ donation. Dr Paul Murphy discussed the Government’s consultation on whether to move from an opt in to an opt out system in England following the example set in Wales.  He felt that ‘the time is right’ for such a move. The talk coincided with the launch of an on-line survey aimed at gaining an insight into the views of the critical care community on presumed consent. You can find it here.  Don’t hold back & share you’re views.  The answers will help form the response to the consultation from the Society and Faculty.

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State of the Art Day 2 Round up

What has really come through in day 2 is the level of engagement and enthusiasm amongst the delegates. The varied program, enthusiasm of the speakers, and the fantastic support teams have taken the meeting from strength to strength.

The myth busting session in the morning got many people thinking: contrast induced nephropathy may not exist, post intensive care syndrome may not have anything to do with intensive care, and the Stewart model might just reign supreme for acid-base interpretation!

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State of the Art 2017 Day 1 Round Up.

We’ve had an incredibly energetic first day at State of the Art. People were buzzing as they entered the gates bright and early and the energy has yet to die down as I write this in the midst of the drinks reception sponsored by GE.

Our social media group were fantastic. They were on hand all day to moderate the various sessions, live-stream interviews with speakers and periscope stream from the conference floor.

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State of the Art – Open to Everyone.

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Dr Jeremy Groves shares his excitement for the upcoming annual State of the Art conference on 04/12/17. 

I’m excited.

I’m excited because, despite the long evenings, some very British rain while cycling home and the prospect of a weekend on-call, I have the State of the Art to look forward to next week.

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FICE Accreditation – past, present and future

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Marcus Peck (@ICUltrasonica), Consultant Intensivist, Frimley Park Hospital, & FICE Chair, discusses the history and growth of FICE and what exciting developments will be coming in the future.  

The first time I saw a heart move I was captivated, and I knew immediately that echocardiography and ultrasound would make a huge impact on intensive care medicine.

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Life support for critical care staff

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Dr Linda Jayne Mottram, Intensive Care Consultant at Belfast HSC Hospital discusses the crucial importance of maintaining clinicians mental wellbeing in the current medical culture.

Basic life support algorithms start with the premise that clinicians check for danger before approaching the patient.  The rationale being that if you are injured by something in the environment, you will be of little practical use to a patient in extremis.   The same logic applies to scene safety in prehospital medicine. No one questions your commitment to the patient by protecting yourself first, because it makes common sense to do so.  You have to be free from injury in order to provide any meaningful assistance.

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Mediating conflict between health professionals, patients and families: It’s all about the human stuff.

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Sarah Barclay, Founder/Director, The Medical Mediation Foundation.

Conflict between patients, families and health professionals is upsetting for all and can affect decision-making about medical care and treatment. All too often the warning signs are missed.  This can lead to a breakdown of relationships that may end up in court. Although recourse to the courts will lead to a decision, there are inevitably perceived to be winners and losers. Complex, often agonising dilemmas for families, patients and health professionals are portrayed (and felt) as battles.

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