Life support for critical care staff

ljmottram65

Dr Linda Jayne Mottram, Intensive Care Consultant at Belfast HSC Hospital discusses the crucial importance of maintaining clinicians mental wellbeing in the current medical culture.

Basic life support algorithms start with the premise that clinicians check for danger before approaching the patient.  The rationale being that if you are injured by something in the environment, you will be of little practical use to a patient in extremis.   The same logic applies to scene safety in prehospital medicine. No one questions your commitment to the patient by protecting yourself first, because it makes common sense to do so.  You have to be free from injury in order to provide any meaningful assistance.

Continue reading “Life support for critical care staff”

A lesson from little Charlie

JG

Dr Jeremy Groves reflects on one implication that the case of Charlie Gard has in adult critical care.

The Charlie Gard case has been the dominant medical story over the last few months.  One cannot but have extreme sympathy for Charlie’s parents who fought valiantly to give their son a chance in life. It was a personal tragedy, played out on social media and in the press, where the pope, presidents, politicians and pundits all had a view and expressed it, informed or otherwise.

Continue reading “A lesson from little Charlie”

The Medical Training Initiative – a personal perspective.

The Medical Training Initiative enables overseas graduates to come to the UK for experience in intensive care. In small and large units with posts and training capacity the scheme can be mutually beneficial. Dr David Odaba, currently working at the Cumberland Infirmary in Carlisle, gives us his view on the application process and the benefit of the experience he gained. – Jeremy Groves

Continue reading “The Medical Training Initiative – a personal perspective.”